West Ham earned a heroic win against Manchester City in the Carabao Cup clash on Wednesday at the London Stadium.

After a pulsating 0-0 draw, the Hammers knocked holders City out of the competition by beating them 5-3 on penalties.

Mark Noble scored the opening goal from the spot-kick that set the tone throughout. However, talkSPORT pundit, Simon Jordan has a different view.

Jordan is a very good pundit who gets most of his opinions bang on, but in this case, it doesn’t look like a well-thought-of statement.

First, he criticised Noble for his tweet on Grady Diangana. The incident happened a year ago, and it has no relevance to what he did against Manchester City on the pitch.

Secondly, he said he shouldn’t be praised for scoring, as it was his normal duty. He says he only praise players when they consistently perform over a period of time.

“I find it really difficult to praise people for what they should be doing in the first place. I praise people for doing something exceptional, for being very good at what they constantly do,” said Jordan.

“For somebody to come on pitch and takes a penalty and score in a penalty shoot-out, I won’t be saying well done to him.”

He also said Noble’s previous objection to Grady Diangana’s sale to West Brom was “disrespectful and disloyal”.

“I just think it was disrespectful, and disloyal.”

“He has to realise he’s a cog in a wheel, and an employee.”

Simon Jordan thinks Mark Noble was wrong regarding his Grady Diangana tweet, and says he shouldn’t be praised for scoring his penalty last night. pic.twitter.com/n5QhwuKw9t

talkSPORT (@talkSPORT) October 28, 2021

Flawed argument

The criticism regarding the Diangana tweet is irrelevant, and hence not worthy of discussion when the context is the EFL Cup analysis.

A football game is not a normal corporate job. It’s primarily a game, and there are subjective elements attached to it, such as psychology, pressure, atmosphere, everything.

Jordan hasn’t taken into account factors like – a) Manchester City have been winning the competition for the past four years and b) the penalty was the climax of the match that will decide the outcome and hence everything was at stake.

It’s more than just doing your job. That’s why it’s a game and not a daily-routine job. Of course, Noble is getting paid for it, but in sports, there are elements that are different from what we see in daily jobs. Equating everything under the same banner is not a cogent argument.

Now, let’s decode his statement.

“I find it really difficult to praise people for what they should be doing in the first place. I praise people for doing something exceptional, for being very good at what they constantly do.”

So it means a) either someone has to score an exceptional goal, make an exceptional pass, an exceptional defending, or an exceptional save during a game to earn praise from Jordan, and b) We are talking about a particular game – a player should be praised / criticised based on that particular game and not for being “consistent” in his career or the season. Yes, of course, they should be praised, but that’s a different context altogether.

“For somebody to come on pitch and takes a penalty and score in a penalty shoot-out, I won’t be saying well done to him.”

This is absurd. Say, it’s a Champions League knock-out stage, and the game has reached the penalty stage. So for Jordan, it is not worthy of praise if a player scores the winning penalty or starts the scoring to give his side a lead in a pressure situation, because it is a normal routine for him.

Had that been the case, Fabio Grosso (as per Jordan) or Andrea Pirlo only did his routine job, and shouldn’t be praised for scoring the crucial penalties (Grosso – final penalty, Pirlo – opening penalty) against France in the 2006 World Cup!

In other West Ham news, we believe that the Hammers will make a move for a teenage sensation after a new development this week.

The post ‘Disrespectful’ – Simon Jordan blasts West Ham star after penalties win v Man City appeared first on West Ham Zone.

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